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Alemany, J. & Cervera, E. (2012), "Appealing Robots as a Means to Increase Enrollment Rates: a Case Study", In Proceedings of the 3rd international conference on Robotics in Education, RiE2012. September 2012., pp. 15-19. MatfyzPress, Czech Republic.
Abstract: As teachers of an elective robotics course in a computer science degree, we have frequently faced the lack of interest of students to enroll, thus stimulating us to introduce attractive robot platforms in the classroom, and to promote robot competitions among students. As a result, course enrollment rates have significantly grown up, even in a context of decreasing number of people undertaking computer science studies. This paper summarizes our experiences during the last 20 years, and some ideas for the near future, aiming to keep those appealing elements, while balancing the load for course preparation and teaching. The use of realistic simulations for virtual robot competitions is expected to provide the same appeal and learning possibilities of robotic hardware platforms, yet minimize the amount of technical work for setting up the course.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{Alemany2012,
  author = {Jaime Alemany and Enric Cervera},
  title = {Appealing Robots as a Means to Increase Enrollment Rates: a Case Study},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of the 3rd international conference on Robotics in Education, RiE2012},
  publisher = {MatfyzPress, Czech Republic},
  year = {2012},
  pages = {15-19},
  note = {ISBN 978-80-7378-219-1}
}
Alimisis, D. (2012), "Robotics in Education & Education in Robotics: Shifting Focus from Technology to Pedagogy", In Proceedings of the 3rd international conference on Robotics in Education, RiE2012. September 2012., pp. 7-14. MatfyzPress, Czech Republic.
Abstract: In this work we highlight the role of constructivist pedagogy and consequent educational methodologies either while using robotics in school education (Robotics in Education) or while training teachers to use robotics for teaching purposes (Education in Robotics). In this framework, constructivist methodologies for integrating robotics in school physics and informatics education and in professional teacher training are suggested. Exemplary projects from each case are reported to demonstrate the learning potential of the proposed educational methodologies involving teachers and students while using robotics to study kinematics and programming concepts in physics and informatics classes of secondary education respectively.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{Alimisis2012,
  author = {Alimisis, Dimitris},
  title = {Robotics in Education & Education in Robotics: Shifting Focus from Technology to 
  Pedagogy},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of the 3rd international conference on Robotics in Education, RiE2012},
  publisher = {MatfyzPress, Czech Republic},
  year = {2012},
  pages = {7-14},
  note = {ISBN 978-80-7378-219-1}
}
Altin, H. (2012), "National Mechatronics and Robotics Elective Course for Upper Secondary School Level", In Proceedings of the 3rd international conference on Robotics in Education, RiE2012. September 2012., pp. 21-24. MatfyzPress, Czech Republic.
Abstract: Recent studies show that pupils are very enthusiastic when using robotic systems and robots in schools. However, in Estonia, these are mainly used only in extracurricular activities to learn about the robots, take part in various contests or for research purposes. Robotics increases the level of problem solving skills and enhances pupils better understanding of various aspects of math and physics. Robots could be used for that but the work done so far in schools in Estonia has been at interest level. To make teaching robotics more systematic, a facultative course of mechatronics and robotics was developed to be available for all high school pupils (aged 16-18). This paper describes the developed course, its structure and methods of teaching.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{Altin2012,
  author = {Heilo Altin},
  title = {National Mechatronics and Robotics Elective Course for Upper Secondary School Level},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of the 3rd international conference on Robotics in Education, RiE2012},
  publisher = {MatfyzPress, Czech Republic},
  year = {2012},
  pages = {21-24},
  note = {ISBN 978-80-7378-219-1}
}
Arlegui, J., Moro, M. & Pina, A. (2012), "Simulation of Robotic Sensors in BYOB", In Proceedings of the 3rd international conference on Robotics in Education, RiE2012. September 2012., pp. 25-32. MatfyzPress, Czech Republic.
Abstract: The paper presents a proposal to simulate several robotic sensors through an implementation in the BYOB authoring environment. The possibility to define custom blocks as specialized reporters is exploited to represent the information usually returned by relevant physical sensors in real robots. Some motivations to use simulated sensors and robots for educational purposes in a well know and not so complex environment like BYOB are also given.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{Arlegui2012,
  author = {Arlegui, Javier and Moro, Michele and Pina, Alfredo},
  title = {Simulation of Robotic Sensors in BYOB},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of the 3rd international conference on Robotics in Education, RiE2012},
  publisher = {MatfyzPress, Czech Republic},
  year = {2012},
  pages = {25-32},
  note = {ISBN 978-80-7378-219-1}
}
Assaf, D., Larsen, J.C. & Reichardt, M. (2012), "Extending Mechanical Construction Kits to Incorporate Passive and Compliant Elements for Educational Robotics", In Proceedings of the 3rd international conference on Robotics in Education, RiE2012. September 2012., pp. 33-40. MatfyzPress, Czech Republic.
Abstract: Robots are a popular educational tool to introduce science, technology, and engineering to students. The field of educational robotics is growing and consequently a number of educational robot kits have been developed within the last decade. Our laboratories have a tradition of teaching embodied artificial intelligence and biomechanics to students with different backgrounds. The robots we use both for research and education are usually built incorporating compliant materials as well as passive dynamics. These kind of properties are often not available in classical robot kits or mechanical construction kits. In this paper we describe some of the robots we use for education. So far we built the robots using 3D printing technology which is convenient but too expensive for class use. Our aim is to find cheaper, commercially available solutions. After a short review
on educational robot kits and mechanical construction kits we describe interface solutions between several kits. Further we show some solutions to incorporate compliant materials and passive dynamics to traditional mechanical construction kits by using cheap and widely available materials.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{Assaf2012,
  author = {Dorit Assaf and Jorgen Christian Larsen and Markus Reichardt},
  title = {Extending Mechanical Construction Kits to Incorporate Passive and Compliant Elements 
  for Educational Robotics},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of the 3rd international conference on Robotics in Education, RiE2012},
  publisher = {MatfyzPress, Czech Republic},
  year = {2012},
  pages = {33-40},
  note = {ISBN 978-80-7378-219-1}
}
Balogh, R. (2012), "Ketchup House -- A Promising Robotic Contest", In Proceedings of the 3rd international conference on Robotics in Education, RiE2012. September 2012., pp. 41-45. MatfyzPress, Czech Republic.
Abstract: In this paper we present a new category Ketchup house, for the international robotics contest Istrobot. The main task is to manipulate ketchup cans and move them to their appropriate positions. The contest had its first run on Istrobot 2012 in Bratislava and gained a well-deserved publicity. We describe origins and rules of this new category as well as results obtained in the first year.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{Balogh2012b,
  author = {Richard Balogh},
  title = {Ketchup House -- A Promising Robotic Contest},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of the 3rd international conference on Robotics in Education, RiE2012},
  publisher = {MatfyzPress, Czech Republic},
  year = {2012},
  pages = {41-45},
  note = {ISBN 978-80-7378-219-1}
}
Barros, T.T.T. & Lages, W.F. (2012), "Development of a Firefighting Robot for Educational Competitions", In Proceedings of the 3rd international conference on Robotics in Education, RiE2012. September 2012., pp. 47-54. MatfyzPress, Czech Republic.
Abstract: This work presents the design and assembling details of a robot developed to take part in an educational robotic competition. A control law based on Lyapunov theory was developed and implemented on a Programmable Logic Controller to control the robot.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{Barros2012,
  author = {Taiser T. T. Barros and Walter Fetter Lages},
  title = {Development of a Firefighting Robot for Educational Competitions},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of the 3rd international conference on Robotics in Education, RiE2012},
  publisher = {MatfyzPress, Czech Republic},
  year = {2012},
  pages = {47-54},
  note = {ISBN 978-80-7378-219-1}
}
Botelho, S.S.C., Braz, L.G. & Rodrigues, R.N. (2012), "Exploring Creativity and Sociability with an Accessible Educational Robotic Kit", In Proceedings of the 3rd international conference on Robotics in Education, RiE2012. September 2012., pp. 55-60. MatfyzPress, Czech Republic.
Abstract: This paper presents a pedagogical proposal for Robotic in Education. The approach explores the creative aspects and social consequences of the collective project of robotic devices. A set of steps that compose the proposed methodology was applied to Brazilian schools. A robotic kit available is also presented, allowing its implementation even in schools with low budget.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{Botelho2012,
  author = {Silvia S. C. Botelho and Lilian G. Braz and Ricardo N. Rodrigues},
  title = {Exploring Creativity and Sociability with an Accessible Educational Robotic Kit},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of the 3rd international conference on Robotics in Education, RiE2012},
  publisher = {MatfyzPress, Czech Republic},
  year = {2012},
  pages = {55-60},
  note = {ISBN 978-80-7378-219-1}
}
Butterworth, D.T. (2012), "Teaching C/C++ Programming with Lego Mindstorms", In Proceedings of the 3rd international conference on Robotics in Education, RiE2012. September 2012., pp. 61-65. MatfyzPress, Czech Republic.
Abstract: Computer programming is a skill required in many professions, not just computer science. Lego Mindstorms NXT can be incorporated into a programming course to add hands-on interactivity that will better engage a broader range of students. Chosing the most suitable programming language is difficult, and this paper summarizes some experiences in teaching students using RoboLab and NXT-G for Mindstorms NXT. The text-based language RobotC is recommended for beginner and intermediate level courses, and various code examples are provided to assist
teachers in building lesson plans. It is suggested that advanced programming should be taught in C++, and an example of using the NXT++ library to control a robot arm is presented. Teaching all levels of programming, using robotics, is more enticing and stimulating for students, and teachers can justify the purchase of expensive robot hardware by employing it in multiple areas of the school curriculum.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{Butterworth2012,
  author = {David T. Butterworth},
  title = {Teaching C/C++ Programming with Lego Mindstorms},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of the 3rd international conference on Robotics in Education, RiE2012},
  publisher = {MatfyzPress, Czech Republic},
  year = {2012},
  pages = {61-65},
  note = {ISBN 978-80-7378-219-1}
}
Carter, J. & Ahmadi, S. (2012), "Design of a Flexible and Project Based Postgraduate Module on Applied Computational Intelligence: A Case Study", In Proceedings of the 3rd international conference on Robotics in Education, RiE2012. September 2012., pp. 67-71. MatfyzPress, Czech Republic.
Abstract: The MSc Intelligent Systems (IS) and the MSc Intelligent Systems and Robotics (ISR) programmes at De Montfort University are Masters level courses that are delivered both onsite and by distance learning. The courses have been running successfully on-site for 8 years and are now in the fifth year with a distance learning mode. The Applied Computational Intelligence module gives students the chance to apply knowledge gained in other modules on an application area of their choice. A substantial number of these involve robotics work though not all. Over the years there have many excellent pieces of work submitted by students for this module and number have gone on to be published. This paper presents the background to the module, ideas for flexible design of such modules, some examples of the students' assignment work and a discussion of the perceived value of the module.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{Carter2012,
  author = {Jenny Carter and Samad Ahmadi},
  title = {Design of a Flexible and Project Based Postgraduate Module on Applied Computational 
  Intelligence: A Case Study},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of the 3rd international conference on Robotics in Education, RiE2012},
  publisher = {MatfyzPress, Czech Republic},
  year = {2012},
  pages = {67-71},
  note = {ISBN 978-80-7378-219-1}
}
Catlin, D., Smith, J.L. & Morrison, K. (2012), "Using Educational Robots as Tools of Cultural Expression: A Report on Projects with Indigenous Communities", In Proceedings of the 3rd international conference on Robotics in Education, RiE2012. September 2012., pp. 73-79. MatfyzPress, Czech Republic.
Abstract: This paper reports on the use of educational robots with indigenous people. It shows how effective educational robots are at providing tools of self expression and act as a bridge between the modern world and the traditions of Native peoples. The original work first took place with Maoris in New Zealand. A similar, independent project, run by the Native American Squaxin People of Puget Sound, a Sovereign Nation in Washington State, embraced the understandings developed in New Zealand. Following a description of the project, we will evaluate the educational effectiveness of the project using the ERA1 Principles as an evaluative framework[1]. We will also discuss the value of ERA as a helpful tool for understanding educational robotics.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{Catlin2012,
  author = {Dave Catlin and James L. Smith and Kenton Morrison},
  title = {Using Educational Robots as Tools of Cultural Expression: A Report on Projects with 
  Indigenous Communities},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of the 3rd international conference on Robotics in Education, RiE2012},
  publisher = {MatfyzPress, Czech Republic},
  year = {2012},
  pages = {73-79},
  note = {ISBN 978-80-7378-219-1}
}
Dúill, M.Ó. (2012), "Reversing Robotic Regression: Why our Culture Rejects Robotics in School", In Proceedings of the 3rd international conference on Robotics in Education, RiE2012. September 2012., pp. 95-103. MatfyzPress, Czech Republic.
Abstract: For over three decades robotics has been taught in primary school as a curricular enhancement. Analysis of old and new material suggests a reduction in cognitive content and regression from reality. The Technicity Thesis is introduced, from which it is possible to re-evaluate technology relative to language. From this cognitive basis the role of the computer in school is reconsidered and the notion of Turing teaching introduced. The requirement for a curriculum for mastery of the computer as a medium follows from this. In this context, the current economic constraints on robotics may be re-evaluated and serious consideration given to a curriculum consistent with neural development in childhood and constructionism.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{Duill2012,
  author = {Micháel Ó Dúill},
  title = {Reversing Robotic Regression: Why our Culture Rejects Robotics in School},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of the 3rd international conference on Robotics in Education, RiE2012},
  publisher = {MatfyzPress, Czech Republic},
  year = {2012},
  pages = {95-103},
  note = {ISBN 978-80-7378-219-1}
}
Fachantidis, N., Paraskevi, A. & Tosiou, D. (2012), "Robots Facilitate Team Building at Adults' Learning Groups for Cultural Studies", In Proceedings of the 3rd international conference on Robotics in Education, RiE2012. September 2012., pp. 81-86. MatfyzPress, Czech Republic.
Abstract: This paper examines if robotic activities can offer a proper context for adults' team-building and also proper learning environment. Effective team-building seems to be an important factor for adults' learning communities, but also for organisations' operation. Socially assistive robotics (SAR) related researches show that human-robot social interaction rather than physical contact, is the success key of many tasks from rehabilitation therapies to cognitive activities. In our project, adults who met each other for first time, participated in robotics hands-on tasks in cultural studies. Tasks involved construction, but also social interaction with humanoid robots. Project implementation and data analysis showed that participants considered that robot involvement had a positive impact in both major goals: participants' team development and cultural aspect learning. Questionnaire analysis showed that the combination of such a technology with cultural activities can offer a context not only suitable for learning, but also for teambuilding. Social interaction with robots motivated participants to achieve progress in learning and to communicate/collaborate as a team.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{Fachantidis2012,
  author = {Nikolaos Fachantidis and Alexandridou Paraskevi and Dimitra Tosiou},
  title = {Robots Facilitate Team Building at Adults' Learning Groups for Cultural Studies},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of the 3rd international conference on Robotics in Education, RiE2012},
  publisher = {MatfyzPress, Czech Republic},
  year = {2012},
  pages = {81-86},
  note = {ISBN 978-80-7378-219-1}
}
Kandlhofer, M., Steinbauer, G., Sundström, P. & Weiss, A. (2012), "Evaluating the Long-Term Impact of RoboCupJunior: A First Investigation", In Proceedings of the 3rd international conference on Robotics in Education, RiE2012. September 2012., pp. 87-94. MatfyzPress, Czech Republic.
Abstract: This paper presents the concept and first empirical results of our endeavor to conduct a long-term qualitative and quantitative evaluation on the impact of the RoboCupJunior (RCJ) initiative. RCJ uses robots as technical tool to educate, motivate and inspire pupils and undergraduate students up to the age of 19. Our evaluation concept is based on three pillars (individual role models and careers, monitoring people on their way through RCJ, best practice examples by mentors). As a first step of our evaluation we have conducted nine semi-structured qualitative interviews with former RCJ participants. The main goal was to get the stories of their 'RCJ careers' and to find out if their participation in RCJ have had any effect on their future development. Especially we wanted to find out if and how RCJ has raised their interest in technology in general or a technical career in particular. Within the scope of this first attempt we take it as a fact that RCJ improves technical, management and social skills and instead we try to figure out why students seem to get 'hooked' on this activity. The motivational factors we have identified so far are the social experience, the engaged community and feelings of success, which should be considered as value concepts for teaching 'interactive technology skills' in general.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{Kandlhofer2012,
  author = {Martin Kandlhofer and Gerald Steinbauer and Petra Sundström and Astrid Weiss},
  title = {Evaluating the Long-Term Impact of RoboCupJunior: A First Investigation},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of the 3rd international conference on Robotics in Education, RiE2012},
  publisher = {MatfyzPress, Czech Republic},
  year = {2012},
  pages = {87-94},
  note = {ISBN 978-80-7378-219-1}
}
Petrovic, P. (2012), "Having Fun with Learning Robots", In Proceedings of the 3rd international conference on Robotics in Education, RiE2012. September 2012., pp. 105-112. MatfyzPress, Czech Republic.
Abstract: Artificial Intelligence has a long tradition at Faculty of Mathematics, Physics, and Informatics of Comenius University. The team around professor Kelemen published a textbook on AI fundamentals in 1992 and some form of AI master study program existed since then, currently as part of both Applied Informatics study program and Middle European Interdisciplinary Master Program in Cognitive Science. From this perspective, and basing on a fruitful cooperation with our colleagues from the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology of Slovak University of Technology, we established a course named Algorithms for AI Robotics for the final year of the bachelor study program at Comenius University, providing both a handson experience in lab robotics projects and a taste of the wide field of applications of computer science to robotics. This article is a contribution to the discussion on the different organisation forms and styles of the robotics courses for undergraduates, summarizes our course and the experience gained. Its main purpose is to inspire other educators and think of their own selection of AI material relevant to robotics. This is the time of important breakthroughs in the field of robotics, cognitive robotics and artificial intelligence and the contents and methods of selecting and presenting the material to students is very important for the future development and applicability of the field.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{Petrovic2012,
  author = {Pavel Petrovic},
  title = {Having Fun with Learning Robots},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of the 3rd international conference on Robotics in Education, RiE2012},
  publisher = {MatfyzPress, Czech Republic},
  year = {2012},
  pages = {105-112},
  note = {ISBN 978-80-7378-219-1}
}
Pittí, K., Curto, B., Moreno, V. & Ontiyuelo, R. (2012), "CITA: Promoting Technological Talent Through Robotics", In Proceedings of the 3rd international conference on Robotics in Education, RiE2012. September 2012., pp. 113-120. MatfyzPress, Czech Republic.
Abstract: Educational robotics gives us a creative way to use technology to implement solutions based on our wit and skills, and not become just consumers of technology. Educational robotics creates learning situations and environments to the application of skills and technological processes, preparing students to live and improve their environment. This article introduces a range of activities - both informal and formal education - developed by the International Centre for Advanced Technologies that allows us the proposal of a new approach of educational robotics as a support tool to explore, identify and develop the technological talent of children and young students.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{Pitti2012,
  author = {Kathia Pittí and Belén Curto and Vidal Moreno and Román Ontiyuelo},
  title = {CITA: Promoting Technological Talent Through Robotics},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of the 3rd international conference on Robotics in Education, RiE2012},
  publisher = {MatfyzPress, Czech Republic},
  year = {2012},
  pages = {113-120},
  note = {ISBN 978-80-7378-219-1}
}
Prayaga, L., Prayaga, C., Wade, A., Suri, N., Whiteside, A., Hawthorne, J., Kulich, M. & Přeučil, L. (2012), "RILE -- Robotic Interactive Learning Environment", In Proceedings of the 3rd international conference on Robotics in Education, RiE2012. September 2012., pp. 121-126. MatfyzPress, Czech Republic.
Abstract: We report the design and alpha-testing of a Robotic Interactive Learning Environment (RILE) to teach introductory one-dimensional kinematics to middle school students. The environment is centered around robots which are controlled via WiFi, and are equipped with sonar sensors to provide distance vs. time data. A student can remote-login via an application and perform experiments on kinematics on the robots and understand the usually difficult concepts of displacement, velocity, and acceleration. The system was initially tested in a middle school for multiple batches of students at the 8th grade level. Initial reactions show that the students were engaged, interested, and excited. In particular, the excitement of working with real robots kept the students alert to pitfalls in the understanding of kinematics, as shown by their responses to qualitative questions
on interpretation of graphical data.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{Prayaga2012,
  author = {Lakshmi Prayaga and Chandra Prayaga and Aaron Wade and Niranjan Suri and Alex 
  Whiteside and Jeff Hawthorne and Miroslav Kulich and Libor Přeučil},
  title = {RILE -- Robotic Interactive Learning Environment},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of the 3rd international conference on Robotics in Education, RiE2012},
  publisher = {MatfyzPress, Czech Republic},
  year = {2012},
  pages = {121-126},
  note = {ISBN 978-80-7378-219-1}
}

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